Haircutting- An Art

Haircutting- An Art

Haircutting is an art. Many people cut hair, but few master the art of haircutting. To become a master haircutter is to understand and practice the fundamentals, principles, and concepts that both limit and produce predictable, desirable results. With all due respect, most stylists cut hair using a combination of things they have seen others do and the evolution of their primary skills from cosmetology school. For most salon guests, these skills are sufficient. Then there are those who are more discriminating; they seek true masters of the skill.

There are only small differences between a good haircut and a great haircut. It can be as simple as misplaced weight in the haircut or misdirection that keeps the haircut from flowing properly. All haircuts are a combination of volume, which is created on the vertical plane, and direction, which occurs on the horizontal plane. Knowing the impact you’re causing on each of these planes when you pick up a section of hair to cut is the key to controlling the outcome of the haircut.

There are three kinds of haircutters. First, there are artistic haircutters that cut by feel. They cut, then look and think, and then cut more. They usually have a good eye and produce a good result. The problem is they lack a system, so if you like it, they most likely can’t reproduce it the next time you’re in. Then, there are mechanical haircutters. They are good at reproducing what they have seen done by others and may use their systems or sectioning for the cut. Most often, they can reproduce the haircut with some consistency. Lastly, there are those that truly understand the cause and effect of haircutting, as well as balance and proportion. Their haircuts are cut to suit you, taking into consideration your face shape, bone structure, and hair type.

 

“A laborer works with his hands. A craftsman works with his hands and his mind.

A master artist works with his hands, his mind, and his heart.”

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